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Short Courses*

Tuesday, August 12 • 6:30 to 9:00pm


Vaccine Production & Manufacturing 

This course provides an excellent overview to vaccine manufacturing with an emphasis on new technologies. Current manufacturing trends that are influencing vaccine production include cell culture-based manufacturing, disposables, aseptic operations, and rational process development. New vaccine production trends will be discussed by those in the field, including how new approaches to production are affecting the way vaccines function.

Overcoming challenges will be addressed, such as optimizing processes for large-scale production including cell line development and manufacture of novel modes of delivery, such as virus-like particles (VLPs).

Additional topics include risk-based studies, Quality by Design, and lifecycle approach to process validation and control. Finally, the globalization of supply will be explored, including its influence on process scale, facility design, product image and regulatory expectations.

  • Disposable/single-use technologies
  • Cell culture-based production
  • QbD
  • Rational process development
  • Lifecycle approach to process validation and control
  • Large-scale production
  • Supply management
  • Regulatory expectations

Instructors:

Robert Boulanger, Ph.D., Technology Manager, Core Team, Protein Sciences

José Manuel Otero, Ph.D., Director, Engineering, Upstream Process Development, Merck
Peter Latham, President, Latham BioPharm Group

 

Cancer Vaccines: Clinical Updates, New Technologies and Challenges 

This short course will focus on recent developments in the field of cancer vaccines. While excitement over the use of checkpoint inhibitors has dominated the field of cancer immunotherapy in recent years, cancer vaccines have made steady progress and important advances. Because of their inherently high specificity as well as the species-specificity of the immune system, progress in cancer vaccine development has been particularly dependent upon the slow pace of human clinical trials. In spite of this, there has been a large increase recently in the number of cancer vaccine efforts. Much has been learned from the failures as well as successes that gives hope for their broader utility in the clinic.


  • Clinical proof of concept
  • Different cancer vaccines modalities
  • Recent clinical updates
  • Case Study: HER2 vaccine to prevent relapse in breast cancer
  • Immunotherapy combination

Instructors:
Jianping Yuan, Ph.D., BM, Research Associate, Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital

Eric von Hofe, Ph.D., President, Antigen Express, Inc.



*Separate registration is required.